by Ethan Aronson

What is all the hype about? Deodorant is deodorant, right?

Well, the term deodorant itself assumes one simple definition: the stuff you use to keep your armpits from stinking. But, there are a TON of ways this can be done: everything from masking the stink with a robust floral arrangement (or edgy forest fauna) to clogging your sweat pores with antiperspirant.

Many of us simply stick to what we know… until we learn something different. I’ve recently learned some new things about body odor and how it all works, along with what’s important when attempting to prevent this natural, albeit stinky, process.

What Causes Body Odor?

It’s a common belief that our sweat stinks. In reality, sweat is primarily made of water and is generally odorless. Stench happens when the bacteria on our skin digest our sweat and create foul odors! Bacteria especially loves the sweat from our pits or between the cheeks.

Antiperspirant vs. Deodorant

In walk antiperspirant and deodorant. Antiperspirant exists to keep your armpits dry and aids in preventing some odor by blocking sweat. Antiperspirant does this by clogging your pores with aluminum and stopping the natural process of sweating. This means your pits stay a bit dryer, and there is less sweat for bacteria to feast on.

Deodorants, on the other hand, do not prevent sweating but deal solely with odor. Many deodorants simply attempt to cover up the stench. Some can work longer than others in masking body odor, but often you’re just left smelling like lavender mixed with B.O. The two begin to tango and it isn’t an aromatically appealing dance.

Lume Deodorant For Underarms & Private Parts is in a league of its own because it stops bacteria from digesting sweat and creating odor. In fact, Lume actually prevents odor from occurring in the first place! Click here to read the story of how Lume revolutionized deodorant with its ground-breaking science.

What is Natural Deodorant?

To be classified as a natural product, according to the USDA, “it must not contain any artificial ingredients or added color, and must be only minimally processed.”

Natural products must also generally follow these guidelines, “ingredients must come from plants, flowers and mineral origins found in nature; no genetically modified (GMO) ingredients; no parabens, sulfates or other harmful substances; limited or no petrochemical ingredients; never tested on animals; manufacturing process retains the integrity of the natural ingredients”.

These definitions may seem lengthy, but they still leave some room for vague interpretation. Therefore, some products that are labeled natural have over-processed some of their ingredients to the point of no longer being truly effective or even recognizable (i.e. baking soda). And anyone who has accidentally walked into poison ivy during a camping trip potty break will attest that not all natural things are good for you.

Most natural deodorants use baking soda to control armpit odor. Baking soda has a very basic pH. This is a problem because your skin naturally has a slightly acidic pH. Applying something basic to naturally acidic skin can cause rashes for a lot of people. (Think of your middle school science class making a volcano with baking soda and vinegar.)

Lume is proud to be a natural deodorant that goes above and beyond its label of “natural” to be as skin-safe and effective as possible! Lume is free from aluminum and baking soda and is vegan, cruelty-free, and naturally-scented (and is also available in Unscented).

What is Organic Deodorant?

The label of organic is not the same as natural, despite the fact that organic products are generally considered natural. Essentially, to be classified as organic, a product has to go through a rigorous certification process. Once certified, organic products are regulated through the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

The other thing to keep in mind with organic products is they can be certified “organic” or “100% organic.” For a product to be considered 100% organic, 100% of the ingredients must be certified organic as well as the processing aids. If a product has just the organic seal from the USDA on it, 95% of the ingredients must be certified organic.

So What Does This Mean?

Whether something has the “right” label on it doesn’t really matter. In the end, the most important thing to do is to check the ingredients. What’s really inside this product? Does it contain elements that are not good for my body? Not all organic products are good for all people, nor are all-natural products good for all people.

Enter Lume. Lume Deodorant is derived from natural ingredients and works better and longer than other leading natural deodorants. It is free from aluminum and baking soda and is vegan and cruelty-free. Lume is unique because it powerfully controls odor anywhere on your body for up to 72 hours, all while being incredibly gentle and skin-safe.

Simply swipe Lume Dedoorant on after showering with a mild, natural soap like Lume Natural Soap for Face & Body that will keep your skin feeling happy and moisturized. Lume Deodorant prevents bacteria from digesting your sweat and creating foul odors, and you find you can go up to three days without needing to shower again. Lume is water-based, so it washes cleanly off your skin and off your clothes. No more yellow pits!

To go even longer in between showers or for the times when you're running all over town and just need a quick refresher, try Lume Deodorant Wipes. With all the same great odor-controlling active ingredients as Lume Deodorant, Lume wipes are skin-safe and also can be used anywhere on your body you have odor, but wish you didn't.

In the end, labels like “natural” and “organic” can be super helpful starting points when looking for new products, but they should never be the end of your research. Look at the ingredients label and learn for yourself whether you want to use a new product!

Did you Lume today?

Ethan Aronson
Ethan Aronson



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